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  1. Please note: 'Advanced Seminar reading' is for 3rd Year students.

     

  2. Week 1: Introduction to Studying Indigenous Religions (taught session) 9 items
    1. In this introductory week we shall consider what Indigenous Religions/Indigenous Lifeways/Indigenous Spiritual Traditions might be, whether they might be any different from religious traditions previously explored during your studies, and how we might study them as non-Indigenous peoples.

       

      This reading will be used to explore what the term Indigenous might mean:

    2. Identifying indigenous peoples for health research in a global context: a review of perspectives and challenges - Judith G. Bartlett, Lucia Madariaga-Vignudo, John D. O'Neil, Harriet V. Kuhnlein 09/2007

      Article Essential This reading will help you reflect on this part of the session.

    3. We will then go on to explore how Indigenous Religions should be studied. This is not an easy question given the Western bias of scholarship - a topic that cannot be marginalised when exploring the lifeways of previously colonised peoples!

      In 1995 Ron Grimes asked the following questions:

      1. Should or should not European Americans be teaching courses on Native American religions?
      2. If we should not, why not, and what would be the results of our deferral?
      3. If we should, how best can we proceed?

      We shall be considering these questions in the light of the work of Linda Tuhiwai Smith, D'Cruz and others. Further, a consideration of terms will be undertaken; what is meant by post- & de-colonization, what is authenticity? And of course, we will discuss whether these things are important.

    4. Additional Resources

  3. Week 2: The Bible and Colonialism (taught session) 9 items
    1. This week we shall explore colonialism and the impact of Christianity upon Indigenous peoples and their lifeways and religions. We shall also explore two Indigenous readings of the Bible: Native American and Aboriginal Australian. The week will lead us into the following week's session on appropriation.

    2. Additional Resources

    3. Week 2: ADVANCED SEMINAR; Misson Schools 2 items
      This week we will explore the Mission School system. For this please do some on-line research around the topic; although in the Australian context you may wish to watch the film Rabbit Proof Fence (2002). A notorious school was Carlisle and there are numerous photographs from this and many other mission schools and similar establishments.
  4. Week 3: Cuban Santeria 6 items
    1. This week we examine Cuban Santeria, with related topics including slavery and Christian missionisation, as well as Indigenous agency and syncretism. This session will start to complicate discussions on appropriation which will be explored later in the module. 

    2. Additional Reading

  5. Week 4: Andean ritual in contemporary Bolivia 11 items
    1. Centuries of Spanish and Portuguese colonisation have introduced elements of Christianity into most if not all indigenous religions in the highlands of Latin America, including the Bolivian Andes. The resulting religious traditions are reproduced by vibrant communities of indigenous practitioners who privilege ritual experiences and ritual expertise over issues of authenticity and sincerity. This week we will explore their religious practices highlighting key issues such as the materiality of the divine in the Andes, the relations between humans and other-than-humans, and the power of rituals.  

    2. Introduction - Frédérique Apffel-Marglin

      Chapter Essential

    3. Additional resources  

    4. Week 4 ADVANCED SEMINAR 4 items
      1. Technologies of the self: a seminar with Michel Foucault - Luther H. Martin, Huck Gutman, Patrick H. Hutton, Michel Foucault 1988

        Book Essential

      2. Additional resources

      3. 'Action' - James Laidlaw, Caroline Humphrey

        Chapter Recommended

  6. Week 5: Neo-colonialism and Appropriation (taught session) 7 items
    1. Following on from week 2, this session will consider the appropriateness of the Western appropriation of Indigenous religions in the light of colonialism. This will lead us onto the issue of intra- vs inter-cultural appropriation and thus raise a number of questions around authenticity. This and later in weeks 8 and 9 we will explore North American Indian spiritual lifeways as an exemplar of relevant issues.  

    2. Additional Resources

  7. Week 6: Museums and the display of Indigenous spiritual artefacts 5 items
    1. This week we return to the Morrison, and Halliwell readings and consider the other-than-human-persons in museums, as well as thinking about the ethics, given a legacy of colonialism, of the display or curating, of Indigenous sacred artefacts. This will ground the week 7 trip.  

    2. Week 6: ADVANCED SEMINAR; Exhibiting Saartjie Baartman; the Hottentot Venus 1 item
      This week picks up on some of the previous weeks in terms of museum displays this week we explore the public display of humans. World’s Fairs and Expositions regularly had people on display. The reading for this week includes a chapter of my PhD which gives a background to the visual display of North American Indian peoples which will be in PDF form; do note that the bibliography is from my entire thesis not just this one chapter.
  8. WEEK 7: ENRICHMENT WEEK 1 item
    1. trip to the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford (all day)  

  9. Week 8: North American Indian Spiritual lifeways (part 1) 17 items
    1. This and next week we explore the spiritual lifeways of several North American Indian traditions.   

        

      This week we will explore land & worldviews and considers the variety of religious traditions in North America, and the role of land in North American Indian traditions. In exploring North American Indian understandings of land, the concept of kinship and ancestors, and relationships with place, space and beings on/in the land, the focus is on the Blackfoot Confederacy and Ojibwa Nations.  

    2. Additional Resources

    3. The American religious experience: a concise history - Lynn Bridgers c2006 (electronic resource)

      Book Recommended

    4. Week 8: ADVANCED SEMINAR; North American Indians and Representations of Land 8 items
      This week I would like you to watch the film Dances with Wolves (1990) or Disney’s Pocahontas (1995). We will explore together the portrayal of the main protagonists, how and how they view the land.
      1. Pocahontas 2001 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential

      2. Dances with wolves - Kevin Costner 2001 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential

      3. Reading

      4. Additional Resources

  10. Week 9: North American Indian Spiritual lifeways (part 2) 4 items
    1. Continuing on from week 8, this week we explore rituals & rites and considers the notion of embodiment, the ambiguity of the notion of sacredness versus potency and focuses on, once more the Blackfoot and Obibwa but also examines the rituals of the Hopi (and Zuni) in relation to the 'Kachina Cult'. This section also addresses Pow-wowing; a once Plains tradition and now a signifier for North American Indian-ness.  

    2. Hopi Kachina; a life force - Barton Wright

      Chapter Essential

  11. Week 10: Aboriginal Australia spiritual traditions 8 items
    1. This week we explore Aboriginal Australian Traditions, focussing on understandings of land and spirits in an Aboriginal Australian context, understandings of The Dreaming, and gender in relation to ritual specialists.  

        

      This set of readings focuses in the role of The Dreaming and its connections with land and spirits in Aboriginal Australian understandings. The Dreaming involves gender related ritual and as such we can consider both men's and women's 'business', and the role of ritual specialist. The Dreaming is one aspect of Aboriginal Australian tradition that has been appropriated in New Age literature, while the Didgeridoo, has been appropriated inter-tribally and inter-culturally – as aspect explored in our week looking at appropriation.  

    2. Additional Resources

    3. Week 8: ADVANCED SEMINAR; Trip talk 1 item
      1. This week we will unpack the trip in relation to the various trips we have been exploring and start discussing possible other spiritual traditions you might wish to explore for your assessment; you have the wealth of a museum to choose from ;o)

  12. Week 11: Maori spiritual traditions 6 items
    1. This week we consider the Maori and explores Maori traditional spirituality in both Aoteraroa/New Zealand and in diaspora, the role of personhood in Maori spirituality, and the role of language in Maori spirituality. In exploring Maori traditions the set of readings focuses upon Maori art and other sacred objects/persons including Hinimihi (who is the only Whare Nui [Maori meeting house] in the Northern Hemisphere), and her use by the London Maori community. The Haka will be explored, especially the differing roles of men and women, picking up on issues of gender and ritual specialisms. In addition the concepts of personhood and Diapora will be addressed alongside the use of language and terminology such as tabu/taboo, which is used in common parlance often without an understanding of their origin and original meaning.  

    2. Maori Religion - T.P. Tawhai

      Chapter Essential

    3. Additional Resources

  13. Week 12: 1-2-1 tutorials 2 items
    1. In this session you have your 1-2-1s so please make use of this session to explore questions and queries about your upcoming assessment.  This session is for level 5 students only.

    2. Week 12: ADVANCED SEMINAR; 1-2-1 tutorials 1 item
      1. In this week's session you need to book a tutorial to discuss your assessment. However, prior to this you must have negotiated a topic and draft title.

  14. Indicative Reading 14 items
    1. Aboriginal religions in Australia: an anthology of recent writings - M. J. Charlesworth, Françoise Dussart, Howard Morphy c2005

      Book Recommended

    2. Santeria: the beliefs and rituals of a growing religion in America - Miguel A. De La Torre 2004

      Book Recommended

    3. Queer indigenous studies: critical interventions in theory, politics, and literature - Qwo-Li Driskill 2011

      Book Recommended

    4. Afro-Cuban Theology: Religion, Race, Culture, and Identity - Michelle A. Gonzalez 2009

      Book Recommended

    5. Readings in indigenous religions - Graham Harvey 2002

      Book Recommended

    6. Indigenous diasporas and dislocations - Graham Harvey, Charles Dillard Thompson 2005

      Book Recommended

    7. Two-spirit people: Native American gender identity, sexuality, and spirituality - Sue-Ellen Jacobs, Wesley Thomas, Sabine Lang c1997

      Book Recommended

    8. Shamans, nostalgias, and the IMF: South Korean popular religion in motion - Laurel Kendall 2010

      Book Recommended

    9. Complicating Spiritual Appropriation - C. Welch

      Article Recommended The scan for this reading can also be found under Week 3: Neo-colonialism & Appropriation.

  15. Websites 3 items
  16. Other readings 30 items
    1. Ayahuasca, ritual and religion in Brazil - Beatriz Caiuby Labate, Edward John Baptista das Neves Macrae 2010

      Book Essential

    2. Is the “North American Berdache” merely a Phantom in the Imagination of Western Social Scientist? - E. Jacobs

      Chapter Essential This chapter is not available electronically due to copyright restrictions.

    3. Was We'wha a Homosexual?: Native American Survivance and the Two-Spirit Tradition - Will Roscoe 01/01/1995

      Article Essential Follow the Online Resource button then click 'PDF' to access the full article.

    4. Religions in focus: new approaches to tradition and contemporary practices - Graham Harvey 2009

      Book Background

    5. Grateful Prey: Rock Cree Human-animal Relationships - Robert A Brightman 01/01/02

      Book Background

    6. Contemporary native american responses to environmental treats in Indian country

      Chapter Background

    7. Dance of the ephemeral

      Chapter Background

    8. Missions, missionaries, and Native Americans: long-term processes and daily practices - Maria de Fatima Wade 2008

      Book Background